About Jack

The country duo of Jack Blanchard and his wife, Misty Morgan, placed 15 singles on the country charts between 1969-1975.

1969 saw their first charting hit, "Big Black Bird," which made its way into the Top 60. But it was 1970's "Tennessee Bird Walk" that would be their biggest and most memorable hit. The song hit the top of the country charts, did well on the pop charts, and even garnered a Grammy nomination.

Jack explains how his column got started:

"Before Misty Morgan and I had hit records, we entertained at an Orlando nightclub. I made a deal with a local newspaper to write a weekly column in return for a free ad for our club. The column spread to other publications and now has thousands of readers around the world." Jack Blanchard




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Billboard Award
Duet of the Year (1970)


Grammy and
CMA Finalists.

ONE FINE WEEK IN ATLANTA

Misty and I often did shows with Jerry Reed, Roy Clark, Grandpa Jones, and Archie Campbell. One of those shows was a week long booking at Atlanta's Chastain Park Amphitheater, an outdoor venue. It was Boots Randolph's show, and he always treated the artists, musicians, and staff as honored guests, with long tables of food and drink backstage, and the party feeling that carried over to the audiences.

Before the first show, Roy stepped out of his bus carrying a glass of unknown iced beverage. Misty said "How're ya doin', Roy?" Roy smiled and said "Gettin' well, honey."

The drinks never caused any real problems, although a couple of times the emcee tried to take acts off stage before they were done. They were innocent mistakes, and kinda funny. We were all friends.

Like most amphitheaters, it was bowl shaped, and the bands were pretty much protected from the weather, but the act out at the front of the stage could get a little wet if it rained. This can be a thrill if you are hooked up to electrical equipment.

We had just finished our show and were walking off, when Archie Campbell was heading out to do his act. I said "It's pretty windy out there, Arch." Archie ran his hand suavely over his hair and said this: "I don't have to worry. I bought the casual style." He was always funny... on or off stage.

The crowds were huge and Saturday night was our closing show. We all met back at the hotel where Boots and his manager X. Cosse had us staying. They had the hotel dining room set up like a king's banquet... tons of food and anything you want to drink. It was a party for everybody in the show, including roadies and friends of friends.

For the first hour everybody was there having a good time, except Jerry Reed, who was conspicuous in his absence. He bounced into the room at about 11:30, said quick hellos to the gang, grabbed a take out box, went through the food table like a lawnmower, and was gone with the wind and his doggy box of food.

Jerry was on Fast Forward, and his whole appearance lasted about seven minutes. Misty went into his bus and got his autograph when we worked together at the Citrus Bowl. We loved Jerry Reed, and he was also my favorite guitar player.

Then, later in the party, there was some excitement going on at the ballroom door when some medics rushed in with a stretcher. We wondered what was up. Roy Clark grinned, raised his glass, and said goodbye to everybody. Then he made himself comfortable on the stretcher, and was carried out to the ambulance and rushed to the airport. He was late and had a plane to catch.

I've tried to report the week's events exactly as they happened, down to the finest detail, but remember, I may have had a beer myself.

The music business used to be more fun than it is now, and we miss all our old friends a lot, but we're so lucky to have been part of that wonderful era.



© Jack Blanchard, 2018